Honeybees informing ComputerVision

A project conducted by RMIT‘s school of media and communication has come up with findings that the brains of honey bees are capable of tackling complex visual problems, as well as creating and applying rules to adapt to those specific scenarios.

This information was published earlier this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), with the explanation that “the miniature brains of honey bees rapidly learn to master two abstract concepts simultaneously, one based on spatial relationships (above/below and right/left) and another based on the perception of difference.”


Image courtesy of iStockphoto/Florin Tirlea

An example of this in humans is the ability to encounter a situation, such as coming up to an intersection, and acting accordingly. This involves a range of realizations and responses, such as observing the traffic light, gauging the speed of vehicles and looking out for pedestrians or bicyclists that might also obstruct the flow of traffic. Based on the information being fed to our brains, we are able to make split-second decisions, something which computers aren’t yet fully capable of doing. This is because it involves processing more than one kind of complex task, and these tasks don’t appear to have anything in common, in the “mind” of a computer.

However, that’s not to say that computers can’t eventually learn this skill, too. By studying the brains of honey bees, researchers hope to learn how this works in them, and then apply those same things to computers, allowing them to process visual inputs efficiently and effectively.

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